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IDAHO WOMEN'S DAY: MARCH 14TH

To ensure the Idaho Women 100 legacy continues on, we will honor the contributions and influence of women in Idaho by celebrating Idaho Women's Day each March 14. Join us in creating an unlimited future for women's leadership in our state! Watch for details on social media.  
Senate Endorses New Idaho Women's Day Holiday
Article titled, "Senate Endorses New Idaho Women's Day Holiday," by Betsy Z. Russell, Boise bureau chief and state capitol reporter for the Idaho Press and Adams Publishing Group.
 

March 14 [has] become “Idaho Women’s Day,” under a resolution that unanimously passed the Idaho Senate [January 29, 2020], in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage and also of the role of women in Idaho, both historically and into the future. The new holiday [won't] require any closing of government offices; instead, it [will] be a commemoration to bring attention and honor to Idaho women. In years when March 14 falls on a Saturday...it [will] be celebrated on the previous Friday; when it falls on a Sunday, it [will] be celebrated on Monday.

The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, granting women the right to vote, was ratified in 1920 when Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify it – but Idaho acted much earlier. “Idaho was a leader, as the fourth state – in 1896 – to grant this right and privilege,” said Sen. Patti Anne Lodge, R-Huston, the lead sponsor of the measure in the Senate.

The Idaho State Historical Society proposed the new commemoration, as part of a series of activities around the state to celebrate the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage [in 2020]. Lodge said it would “create an Idaho Women’s Day to recognize the importance of women in Idaho’s past, present and future.”

The Historical Society carefully selected the date, Lodge said, to fall within Women’s History Month, a national commemoration; and to fall on “a significant date in the history of women in Idaho.” In 1891, March 14 was the date that the first Idaho Legislature approved the Idaho state seal, the only state seal designed by a woman, Emma Edwards Green.

Green’s seal, notably, depicts both a man and a woman, on an equal plane. It also recognizes key Idaho industries and symbols.

“Her symbolism combined the ideals of justice and liberty in Idaho’s future, and placed men and women at equal stature on our seal at a time of serious discussion regarding women’s suffrage,” Lodge told the Senate.